Aliceville, Alabama

"You've got to have trust in each other.  You know I'm just a small town mechanic, but when I'm working on someone's car- I've put my whole trust in them.  And they, in that moment, have put they're whole trust in me.  For lots of people these days, I'm the only mechanic they'll use.  But trust- it is something you've got to build- not because of what you've done or who people think you are- but who you are.  Like for example, I've been in the pen two times.  I'll be having a great ol' conversation with someone and the moment I tell them I've been in the penitentiary - they stand all back and their faces change.  It is not because of who I am now- but what I done then.  I am not trying to defend myself, but I was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.  And race out here- when we were in the penitentiary or when I was in the military, we were all one.  We'd sleep together in our bunks... talk together.  Race didn't much matter.  THen when they unleashed us into the dining hall, we all went to our seperate tables.  Mexicans to the Mexican tables.  Blacks to the black tables.  Whites to the whites.  But if someone had come down to us and told us to divide ourselves there would have been an uproar.  It has just got to be built on trust.  Trust takes a really long time.  There's no other way.  There's lots of people around here that I've never even talked to before.  They just look at you and make their assumptions.  No questions aked.  It is stopping, sitting and talking to people one on one where trust is built."

“You’ve got to have trust in each other. I’m just a small town mechanic, but when I’m working on someone’s car- I’ve put my whole trust in them. And they, while I’m there, have put their whole trust in me. For some people, I’m the only mechanic they’ll let touch their car. It is cause they trust me. But trust- it is something you’ve got to build- not because of what you’ve done or who people think you are- but who you are. There’s lots of people around here I’ve never talked to before. They look at you and make their assumptions. No questions asked. It is stopping, sitting and talking to people one on one where trust is built. Like for example, I’ve been in the pen two times. I’ll be having a great ol’ conversation with someone and the moment I tell them I’ve been in the penitentiary – they stand all back and their faces change. It is not because of who I am now- but what I done then. I am not trying to defend myself, but I was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Race happens the same way. When we were in the penitentiary or when I was in the military, we were all one. We’d sleep together in our bunks… talk together. Race didn’t much matter. In those small quarters, you trust each other. You had to. Then when they unleashed us into the dining hall, we all went to our separate tables. Mexicans to the Mexican tables. Blacks to the black tables. Whites to the whites. It was comfortable. If someone had come down to us and told us to divide ourselves there would have been an uproar. Trust happens really slowly… it takes time. And sometimes it is in strange places.”

 

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